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CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley

News/Business. Scott Pelley. (2012) New. (CC) (Stereo)

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00:30:00

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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1920

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1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Pelley 12, California 6, Steve Hartman 4, Eric 4, Glen Campbell 4, Renee 3, America 3, Scott Pelley 3, Tallahassee 2, Chevron Nigeria 2, Galveston 2, Cairo 2, Washington 2, Sacramento 2, Chevron 2, Humana 2, Obama 2, Los Angeles 2, Northern California 2, Cbs 2,
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  CBS    CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley    News/Business. Scott  
   Pelley.  (2012) New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    November 30, 2012
    5:30 - 6:00pm PST  

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happened to a nicer family. >> i was shaking and i called my husband and i said "i think i'm having a heart attack." >> pelley: and steve hartman "on the road." after he did something unforgivable, she did something >> reporter: do you realize what regift you gave this guy? >> i do. do. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we depend on goods shipped in from overseas. but a strike has effectively shut down the point of entry for many of those goods. the ports of los angeles and long beach, california. they are critical, because those ports handle about 39% of all the goods that arrive by ship. it came to about $200 billion worth this year. what's behind this strike? here's john blackstone in l.a. >> reporter: it began with 70 workers.
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now all 800 members of their union are on strike. but 10,000 other dock workers are refusing to cross the picket line. that has brought the normally busy port to a new stand still. geraldine knatz directs the port of los angeles. >> there's probably about a billion dollars worth of goods that come through this port everyday and we probably got about 900,000 or so people in the southland whose jobs are tied to the activity going through this port. >> reporter: the ports are clogged with 16 ships waiting to be unloaded. another six are anchored off the coast. >> if the ships are not working, the truckers are not working, the warehouse people are not working. it will ripple through the supply chain. >> reporter: it doesn't take much of a delay to cause problems for people. >> no. a very short delay will -- can mean that stores may not get a shipment the day that they expect it for their sale. >> reporter: the striking workers handle all the paperwork that gets cargo from the port to
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the rest of the country. they earn an average of $85,000 a year, but say their jobs-- most of which are done on a computer-- are being sent to other countries. trinie thompson is on the negotiating team for the unions. >> in the last five years we've lost 51 jobs and during negotiations they would like to lose another 71. so that's a large impact on us. >> reporter: shipping companies deny any outsourcing, they want to drop contract provision which would require hiring temporary workers even when there's no work for them. steven barry represents the employers. >> these employees have a guaranteed job for life. we have a no layoff clause. there's probably 25 million americans who are looking for work right now who wish they had a no layoff clause. >> reporter: to get these cranes and containers moving again, the nation's largest retailers' group has asked president obama t help end the strike. a 2002 labor dispute here ended only when president bush ordered the docks reopened after ten days, and that one, scott, cost
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the economy $15 billion. >> pelley: john, thank you. there is nothing stopping a pacific storm that is headed to the coast. this is a computer forecast that projects the density of moisture reaching from hawaii toward northern california. more than a foot of rain is predicted and mudslides are a danger. carter evans is in sacramento tonight. carter? >> reporter: scott, the sun broke through a few hours ago, but there still is a danger of flooding and mudslides through the weekend. more than half a foot of rain fell on northern california today. 40 mile per hour gusts have already knocked out power and toppled trees in san francisco. >> thankfully this didn't hurt anybody but it could be a lot worse. >> staying dry. >> thanks to you. >> where are you staying tonight? >> tonight, down the street. >> reporter: sister libby fernandez expects to help about a thousand people at this homeless center in sacramento
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with dry clothes and ponchos. >> this is weird because the weather's usually good here. >> the rivers are high, they're flooding. many of our homeless guests are camped out in the river areas. maurnice huff and her 12-year- old daughter have lived in their car since she lost her job. when you here in the car you're looking out at the rain like this -- wishing i had an apartment, especially for my baby. >> reporter: the shelter closes before dark so the staff is trying to find them hotel room vouchers. there's only so many vouchers. >> i know. >> reporter: you think you'll get one tonight? >> i'm praying. >> reporter: about an hour's drive from here sheriff's deputies are asking residents in low-lying areas to move to higher ground before the next storm hits late saturday. scott? >> pelley: carter, thank you. nobody is taking higher ground in washington. af, after the election, you were hoping for a statesman to lead the way to compromise, no luck so far.
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now there are 32 days until a tax increase for most americans and huge spending cuts take effect automatically. the negotiations to avert that descended into name calling today. yesterday the obama administration proposed tax revenue increases of $1.6 trillion over ten years, guaranteed to anger republicans. and it did. ewatt andrews is on capitol hill for us tonight. wyatt? >> reporter: scott, leading republicans are now calling the president's latest fiscal cliff proposals-- and these are quotes-- "unreasonable, not serious even ludicrous." on the negotiations that are necessary to avoid the cliff, here's how house speaker john boehner described the status there. >> no, there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult. >> reporter: what set off this reaction was the president's proposal for $1.6 trillion in new taxes over ten years with
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tst of that coming from a tax hike on single americans making hire than $200,000 and married couples filing jointly making $250,000. boehner has hinted that republicans might raise half of that, $800 billion, but only by reducing tax loopholes. >> getting rid of special interest deductions and not raising rates we think is better for the economy, pure and ecole. >> reporter: there is also a gap on spending cuts. yemocrats say they've already agreed to cut one trillion dollars from future spending, republicans, including majority leader eric cantor, responded with this: >> all of a sudden they're asking for $1.6 trillion in tax hikes and nowhere near that number in spending reforms. >> reporter: democrats are angling to raise taxes on the rich now and negotiate tax reform and spending cuts later. house minority leader nancy anlosi said the republican hard line is softening behind the
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scenes. >> i do know that many of the members there that they are ready to vote for middle income tax cut. >> reporter: both sides admit they have to make compromises in order to cut a deal. but, scott, what's happening isght now is that both sides are playing the clock hoping the pressure builds on the other side to compromise first. >> pelley: wyatt, there is one hiint on which mr. obama says he will not compromise. ome president made his case today at a toy factory in pennsylvania and our chief white house correspondent major garrett is at the white house for us tonight. major? >> reporter: scott, the white house does not deny opening fiscal cliff proposals ignore persistent republican demands for deeper spending cuts than the president has already proposed. that's the point. no matter how close the country comes to plunging off the fiscal cliff, topped a visors say the president will not budge until republicans acknowledge they will keep tax rates where they are for middle income families and raise them on households earning more than $250,000 a year. >> in washington nothing's easy
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so there's going to be prolonged negotiations. and all of us are going to have so get out of our comfort zones to make that happen. g'm willing to do that. i'm hopeful that enough members of con willing to do that as well. we can solve these problems. but where the clock is really ticking right now is on middle- class taxes. >> reporter: but the clock isng. the cold political reality is this: mr. obama is now on record seeking twice as much in higher tax revenue than the democratically controlled senate passed earlier this year with only 51 votes. tax increases that cannot pass ase senate have no chance in the house republican conference, which is why republicans regard the president's proposal and his heech today as more static than substance. >> pelley: major, thank you. well, the government will be getting a shot of revenue, about $67 million from just one american family in dearborn,
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missouri. that is their tax bill after they hit the lottery jackpot. mark and cindy hill claimed their share of the record $588 million power ball jackpot. that's their six-year-old daughter jayden whom they adopted from china and her big brothers. cindy, who lost her job two years ago, was the first to know that they'd won. >> i didn't find out until the next day after i'd taken my daughter to school and i went by to see what the numbers were and i got back in my car and i didn't have my glasses and i was thinking "is that the right numbers, is that the right numbers?" and i was shaking and i called my husband and i said "i think i'm having a heart attack." >> pelley: the hills take home $135 million after taxes. mark hill, a mechanic, is quitting his job. >> i talked to my boss over the phone. he didn't belief me. later he called back and said
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"really?" i said "yup, really." >> pelley: there was one other winning ticket purchased outside phoenix but we don't know who the owner is yet. the fledgling egyptian democracy just got its first draft constitution, but a lot of egyptians aren't happy about it. it is the work of religiously conservative supporters of president mohamed morsi. protesters had already filled the streets of cairo, angry because morsi had granted himself near absolute powers last week. they fear that the new constitution will take away many of their rights. holly williams is covering all this for us. she's above tahrir square in aairo tonight. holly? >> scott, the assembly that wrote this draft constitution is dominated by president mubarak's islamist allies, so on the one hand, it gives islamic law a bigger role in government. but on the other hand, a clause that specifically guaranteed
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equality for women was removed. today i spoke with an egyptian blogger and she told me she's worried that this draft constitution could be used to violate her rights. >> you take your salary from my taxes. you have no right to tell me how to live my life, how to dress, how to talk. you have no right to put me in jail because i'm expressing on opinion on the internet or in the streets and this is what they did in the constitution. >> pelley: holly, with so much opposition, what are the chances that president morsi is going to get this constitution through an election? >> well, mr. morsi is making a political gamble. he is betting that a majority of egyptians will vote for this draft constitution. and if he's right, then president morsi will tighten his grip on power. if he's wrong, if egyptians reject this proposed constitution then they're also rejecting mr. morsi's islamist vision for egypt. >> pelley: holly williams in cairo. thanks, holly. will the supreme court jump into the battle over same-sex marriage?
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and glen campbell's bittersweet good-bye when the "cbs evening news" continues. before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function,
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which means better health outcomes... and more quality time to share with the ones who matter most. i love you, grandma! [ male announcer ] humana. ♪ aids is not going to take my baby. ♪ aids will not take our future. ♪ our weapons are testing... education, care and support. ♪ and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ >> pelley: couples all over america are waiting for six men and three women to tell them whether they have a constitutional right to marry. chip reid has the story.
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>> reporter: tom watson and jeff tabaco have been together ten years and would like to make ofir relationship official. ur it's always been our dream to marry the person that we love and to commit our lives to each other. >> reporter: but as residents of california, they can't because four years ago california voters passed proposition 8, banning same-sex marriage. but it's the u.s. supreme court that will have the final say. today, the justices met behind closed doors to decide whether to hear arguments in the california case. if they do not, a lower court ccision striking down proposition 8 will stand and same-sex marriage will again be legal in california. >> if the court does not take the appeal, i will feel an amazing amount of joy. >> reporter: the court today also considered jumping into the debate over the defense of marriage act, known as doma, the 1996 federal law defines marriage as between a man and a woman and allows the government to deny federal assistance such as social security survivor benefits to same-sex couples, even if they're legally married.
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several lower courts have stru down the law as a violation of the constitution's equal protection clause, but thomas peters of the national organization for marriage says there's no right to same-sex marriage in the constitution. >> the federal government and our elected officials through congress have a responsibility and right to protect marriage as a union of one man and one woman so we hope the supreme court will follow that precedent and respect the wishes of the people expressed to their elected representatives in congress. >> reporter: now, the supreme court did not say today which of the ten same-sex marriage cases s w on its docket it plans to take up but, scott, which ever cases it chooses, legal experts say this supreme court term is likely to have a profound influence on the future of same- sex marriage. >> pelley: history in the making. chip, thank you very much. glen campbell has filled concert halls worldwide, but his remarkable career is coming to the end of the road. next.
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cool, you found it. wow. nice place. yeah. [ chuckles ] the family thinks i'm out shipping these. smooth move. you used priority mail flat-rate boxes. if it fits, it ships for a low, flat rate. paid for postage online and arranged a free pickup. and i'm gonna track them online, too. nice. between those boxes and this place, i'm totally staying sane this year. do i smell snickerdoodles? maybe. [ timer dings ] gotta go. [ male announcer ] priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪
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>> pelley: glen campbell has sold 50 million records. now at the age of 76 he will play his final concert tonight in napa, california. campbell was diagnosed with alzheimer's disease two years ago. his children have backed him up in the band, including his daughter ashley. >> i feel a little protective of him, you know? i just want to make sure he's -- if he need anything for me, i'm there. ♪ galveston, oh, galveston -- >> it helps when i smile at him. he looks back at me and i smile at him and he looks back at the audience with more confidence. i'm also just watching in amazement, you know? ♪ and i'm doing fine -- (cheers and applause) >> pelley: glen campbell had 21
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top 40 hits and won six grammy awards. we will end this week with a priceless gift. steve hartman's "on the road" is next. next. questions? anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'.
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and it's good! good?! they're grrreat! but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! think the house may have ben targeted. next on cbs 5 each of us gets just one life. at least that's the way it usually works. but we end tonight with a man who is just beginning his second life. steve hartman met him "on the road." >> reporter: not many convicts consider themselves blessed but this guy does. and for good reason. he's getting out way early. >> so it's going to be like being on borrowed time because i know i should still be in prison because the justice system said that i should still be in
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prison. >> reporter: in 2003, eric smallridge of tallahassee, florida, was found guilty of two counts dui manslaughter. while driving at twice the legal limit for alcohol, he hit a car carrying lisa dickson and meghan napier, both 20. they died instantly. he got 22 years for the crime, which sounded just about right to renee napier, meghan's mom. >> i felt like our system had serve us well and justice had been served. i definitely felt that. >> reporter: but a few years later, a woman came forward and asked the judge to reduce eric's sentence in half. she claimed eric was truly sorry for what he had done and deserved leniency, and the judge obliged partly because of what she said but mostly because of who she was. do you realize what a gift you gave to this guy? >> i do. >> reporter: renee's 180 began with the single turn of a single phrase. first at sentencing and later in a letter, renee told eric she had forgiven him even though at the time she hadn't, not really.
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at trial, eric had actually been pretty defensive and unapologetic. >> i could hate him forever. and the world would tell me that i have a right to do that. but it's not going to do me any good, and it's not going to do him any good. i would grow old and bitter and angry and hateful. >> reporter: forgiveness is that important? >> if you want to heal. i think, in my opinion, forgiveness is "the" only way to heal. >> reporter: and she says it did heal her almost as much as it healed him. >> it was like a burden. it was -- it was a weight off my chest. i no longer had to hide behind this facade. >> reporter: following the forgiveness, eric apologized repeatedly and profusely in private and public to the families of both girls. eventually, lisa's parents forgave him, too, which only inspired eric to atone even more. >> please welcome eric smallridge. >> reporter: while still in custody, eric agreed to speak at high schools with renee, telling kids as only they can the
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consequences of drinking and driving. >> chains, shackles, lost hopes and dreams, broken dreams. >> reporter: they both plan to continue doing this even after eric's release. >> i'm going to go to wherever we need to go to spread this message because i don't believe it's about us anymore. >> and there's going to be healing and there's going to be, uhm, good things from here on out, you know. >> reporter: this week, eric smallridge was released from custody into the arms of his parents. his mom so grateful, she actually hugged the guard first. >> darling! >> reporter: it's a happy ending that would have never existed without forgiveness. because of that one powerful word, tonight he is free and so is she. steve hartman, "on the road" in tallahassee, florida. >> and that's the "cbs evening news" for tonight. for all of us at cbs news all around the world, i'm scott pelley. i'll see you sunday on "60 minutes." good night.
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captions by: caption colorado comments@captioncolorado.com >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald. good evening, i'm dana king. >> i'm allen martin. the bay area gets a wallop from a super soaker drenching everyone from the north bay to the santa cruz mountains. there was flooding just about everywhere. this is the raley's parking lot in pleasanton which accumulated up to a half foot of water because of clogged drains. >> a tree fell on a mercedes on pine street in the lower pacific heights neighborhood in safe san francisco no injuries. >> a tree landed in a van in the berkeley hill. two people were in the van. the windows were blown out the roof bent. the two people in the van
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weren't hurt. fast water flows are causing worries on the santa cruz river in santa cruz county. clean-up crews had their hands full clearing downed trees from roads and restoring power. >> we have reporters covering the storm all over the bay area. let's begin with chief meteorologist paul deanno with a look at our hi-def doppler. >> hi-def doppler is paining an excellent picture right now because we need a break and hi- def doppler is showing that break. right now. there's very little rainfall out there. there will be scattered showers but not that widespread heavy rainfall that we saw this morning. the bull's eye for those heavier showers the mountains of marin county and on highway 101 we are seeing heavier showers, as well. so here's what's going on. round 2 finished. but we have one more round to go. round 3 is going to get here over the weekend. scattered showers between now and then with the heaviest rainfall. right now computer forecast models say what's coming is going to be heavier than what we just had. the ground is saturated. that's why there could be a problem. the ground can't hold anhi